She Drives Me Crazy
Fine Young Cannibals
The Raw & The Cooked

somewhereinaburstofglory:

Fine Young Cannibals - “She Drives Me Crazy”

She drives me crazy
Like no one else
She drives me crazy
And I can’t help myself


Deux Jours, Une Nuit

(Two Days, One Night)

(Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne, 2014)

Since their international breakthrough some 20 years ago the Dardennes have spent their time excelling at making unassuming little movies that in their telling make big points. When I saw they were working with Marion Cotillard, a star far bigger than any other that has ever appeared at the centre of one of their movies, I got a little bit concerned that they were abandoning what brought ‘em to the dance in favour of something a little bit more…movie-ish. Thankfully that isn’t even remotely the case, and this film is right up there with my two favourites of theirs to date, Rosetta, and La Promesse.

Cotillard IS brilliant. There is no movie starness at all in her performance. It’s a fairly showy role, a woman recovering from a battle with depression, begging for her job, but Cotillard never plays the big moments big, she exercises restraint every step of the way, yet through her face, her voice, her hunched shoulders, there is so much emotion bleeding from her every little expression. She’s surrounded by a multiracial cast, and Dardennes regulars like Olivier Gourmet, and Fabrizio Rongione who all keep things tremendously down to earth, and go the extra mile towards evoking the realities of working class Belgian society that the Dardennes have always aimed to represent on screen.

Compared to some of their other movies this is one of their most plot based efforts to date, and they use that plot to explore depression in incredibly restrained, unpreachy, non sensationalist fashion, that is as well handled as I’ve ever seen it done on screen, and they tie that in magnificently and uncomfortably with recession era woes, subtly communicating the impact of the higher classes actions on working men and women beyond the few on which we focus with just a scene or two. There’s something Upton Sinclair-esque in the great tragedy of a woman recovering from depression having to beg her colleagues for solidarity, for the chance to continue doing the job that sent her spiraling into the abyss to begin with.

More simply than that the film also takes us on a more straightforward emotional odyssey that ends on a beautiful note of hope, that stands beautifully alongside all the emotional anguish we’ve born witness to for an hour and a half, not forgetting or trivializing it, but honestly finding its way to a light at the end of the tunnel. It is the Dardennes at their best, operating perfectly on so many levels, as straightforward narrative cinema, as social allegory, and filmmaking masterclass, written, acted, edited with economy, class, and nothing but the truth.


The Expendables 3

(Patrick Hughes, 2014)

The first Expendables was a nice throwback to days gone by for those of us who grew up watching the kind of movies that the majority of the guys that made up that ensemble were making in the 80s and early 90s. The second one took more of a comedic approach to a similar end, and for me at least the different approach worked very well (maybe better).

Now this one? Hmmm… Consider me let down. Adding more names was nice, though it’s a shame most of them were hardly in it (Snipes in particular, Ford to a lesser extent), not only were they hardly in it but the rest of the crew hardly were either. The film shifts focus far more onto Sylvester Stallone as an individual lead, and the next generation of ‘expendables’. I didn’t sign up for this! (actually, I did want to see Ronda Rousey, and honestly… It’s 1-0 to Gina Carano. Rousey recites her lines like a robot) I want my grizzled old action stars who are far too old to be doing this back! Beyond that, it’s fine. It doesn’t do anything particularly new, different or special, and the overall tone I thought got a little bit lost somewhere between the darker intent of the original, and the lighter one of the sequel without ever committing fully to either.

All that said, there are highlights. There’s more than once nice throwback moment, and Antonio Banderas and Mel Gibson are both spectacular. Banderas is doing some of his best work in years. It’s far more in line with his early Almodovar work, and his Puss in Boots stuff, and he’s just on fire. His delivery is first class, and the way he carries himself just physically adds so much hilarity to everything he does. There’s also a mad amount of vulnerability running beneath the surface the whole time that amplifies everything he does too, and keeps it from being a cartoon. Gibson, it’s something to be reminded of what this guy is capable of. Overall, like Snipes and Ford he probably doesn’t get quite as much to do as he should have, but when he does… He has one scene on a plane that he just devours in all his mad Mel magnificence. The two of them are special, and they’re the only things about the film that are, and that’s a shame. If they make another of these I hope they balance things out better.



dailybangarang:

Jurassic Park (1993)

<3

dailybangarang:

Jurassic Park (1993)

<3


inlanddaily:

Katie Ledecky sets another record
GOLD COAST, Australia — Katie Ledecky sliced almost six seconds off her own world mark in the women’s 1,500-meter freestyle on Sunday, winning in 15 minutes, 28.36 seconds to post her second world record in as many nights at the Pan Pacific championships.

4 days, 4 individual events, 4 gold medals, 2 world records. Not bad, not bad.

inlanddaily:

Katie Ledecky sets another record

GOLD COAST, Australia — Katie Ledecky sliced almost six seconds off her own world mark in the women’s 1,500-meter freestyle on Sunday, winning in 15 minutes, 28.36 seconds to post her second world record in as many nights at the Pan Pacific championships.

4 days, 4 individual events, 4 gold medals, 2 world records. Not bad, not bad.


snowce:

Kim Gordon, New York City, 1970

snowce:

Kim Gordon, New York City, 1970


Happy 51 to a straight up badass. <3


goddamnfuckingfandoms:

In a room full of pussys, I’m the only one with a vagina.


Only Lovers Left Alive

(Jim Jarmusch, 2013)

When a movie crawls along at as glacial a pace as this one, when as little real action takes place as does in this one, it can often lull its audience right to sleep, but despite being 2 hours in length, and probably feeling it, I found this movie monstrously compelling the whole way through.

The majority of credit for that I feel must go to the actors. Tilda Swinton is just a star. This is not a big showy role, it’s not one that will win awards, or readily express its brilliance in small clips out of context. It’s just a star, quietly being one. She oozes charm, she radiates cool. Tom Hiddleston bounces beautifully off of her and others. He beautifully embodies the anguishes of eternal life, even when the script probably doesn’t go into as much detail in that regard as it might have done, as I wish it had, I think the actors make this more interesting than it’d be with lesser performers in the roles. Hiddleston’s approach is super stone faced, and yet he and Swinton are so good together that in tandem with her he becomes equally as interesting, and his wickedly dry one liners are knocked out of the park as only someone who’d spent so much of the past 3 years playing Loki could do. John Hurt impresses in his short time on screen too, presenting another face of a life perhaps too long lived, drained, haggard as ever, he’s put to tremendous use, and Mia Wasikowska steps way outside of her comfort zone, flipping the bird to all the detractors who claimed she was a limited, or dull actress. She lights up the movie in her time on screen bringing both laughs, and a most palpable sense of danger in equal measure. Anton Yelchin slips nicely into things too, though as the clueless straight man in all this he’s really just sort of the totem pole that the rest all dance around.

Jim Jarmusch has always been a polarizing sort of filmmaker. He’s not a guy even remotely interested in pandering to the masses. He makes his viewer work, and as I mentioned before, his languid pacing here… I like the touch. I think it is deliberately done by a guy who knows how good the cast he’s assembled is, and who has faith in them to carry this thing along. What does it all mean? I think as with all his best work you can interpret it in any number of ways, and can appreciate it entirely as a straight piece of dark romantic cinema, or start digging beneath the surface to uncover hidden meanings about this, that, and the other. Great music too, terrific sound work, and just gorgeously shot.